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Increasing the effectiveness of adherence interventions may have a far greater impact on the health of the population than any improvement in specific medical treatments.
World Health Organisation

Taking medicine as prescribed is not easy

Life happens, and there are many both intentional and unintentional reasons for not taking your medicine, here are some of them.

Remembering if you actually took it
Fear of side-effects

Changing habits
Being unsure about getting the right treatment
Simply forgetting
Life gets in the way

Statistics

Clinical trials

Around 40% of participants enrolled in clinical studies do not take their medicine as prescribe after the first 150 days. This leads to longer more costly trials and an increased number of participants required to keep statistical power. As shown in the table, a one percent improvement of adherence can result in large cost savings in all trial phases. Being informed about the participants adherence also results in a faster dose strength selection. The dosing regime selection is a leading reason for delays in regulatory approval of a drug.

References: M.Alsumidaie (2017) Non-Adherence: A Direct Influence on Clinical Trial Duration and Cost
Average cost savings with 1% improved adherence in clinical trials (US dollar)
bar chart with cost savings with 1 % improved adherence in trial phases
bar chart with 171 billion dollars in red
Today’s cost of non-adherence

Medical treatment

Poor adherence leads to a decreased number of days on treatment, unnecessary treatment switches and large financial losses. On a global scale, non-adherence is estimated to reach an avoidable cost of 171 billion US dollars per year for the healthcare system.

References: T.Aitken et al. (2012) Advancing the Responsible Use of Medicines: Applying Levers for Change

Medical treatment

Poor adherence leads to a decreased number of days on treatment, unnecessary treatment switches and large financial losses. On a global scale, non-adherence is estimated to reach an avoidable cost of 171 billion US dollars per year for the healthcare system.
References: T.Aitken et al. (2012) Advancing the Responsible Use of Medicines: Applying Levers for Change
Today’s cost of non-adherence

Without any objective measurement of drug compliance, physicians have become used to opting almost always...for enhancing doses or prescribing new drug combinations...However, there is usually no rational basis for this decision
As Burnier et al.

Patient health

Not taking medication as prescribed leads to poor health outcomes. Only in the United States, non-adherence is associated with 125 000 deaths, 10% of hospitalisations and $100 billion in health care services annually. Globally, non-adherence is estimated to cause 33% to 69% of medication-related hospital admission.

References: V.Kini and P.M Ho (2018) Interventions to Improve Medication Adherence: A review, L.Osterberg and T.Blaschke (2005) Adherence to Medication
Broken pill
33%-69%
Of medication-related hospital admission
caused by non-adherence
A pie chart with 50% red
Among patients with chronic illnesses
do not take medications as prescribed

Chronic diseases

Treatment of chronic illnesses commonly includes long-term medication. Although these medications are effective, their full benefits are often not realised because approximately 50% of patients do not take their medicine as prescribed. This leads to increased illness and death and is estimated to result in costs of $100 billion per year.

References: M.T Brown and J.K Bussell (2011) Medication Adherence: WHO Cares?  

Chronic diseases

Treatment of chronic illnesses commonly includes long-term medication. Although these medications are effective, their full benefits are often not realised because approximately 50% of patients do not take their medicine as prescribed. This leads to increased illness and death and is estimated to result in costs of $100 billion per year.
References: M.T Brown and J.K Bussell (2011) Medication Adherence: WHO Cares?  
Among patients with chronic illnesses
do not take medications as prescribed

Testing Mevia’s solutions

Case studies

Case study 1:

In a home care setting, Mevia's solutions were used on 21 residents between the ages of 75 and 90. During the 3-month study, medical deviation decreased from 60% to 14% compared to the same period the year before.

Case study 2:

Fifteen subjects over 80 years of age used Mevia's solutions with placebo medication in multi-dose packages for 4 weeks. With the support of the application, the adherence was 87%.

Download study
A pie chart with 60% red
Adherence deviation
without Mevia’s solution
A pie chart with 14% green
Adherence deviation
with Mevia’s solution
A pie chart with 97% green
Accuracy that the pill actually is taken when it has been taken out from the package.

Is the dose really taken?

Our solutions use electronic monitoring to measure when a pill is taken out from the package. When taken out from the package, studies confirm that 97% also consumes the pill.

Reference: M.Burnier (2019) Is there a threshold for medication adherence? Lessons learnt from electronic monitoring of drug Adherence

Is the dose really taken?

Our solutions use electronic monitoring to measure when a pill is taken out from the package. When taken out from the package, studies confirm that 97% also consumes the pill.

Reference: M.Burnier (2019) Is there a threshold for medication adherence? Lessons learnt from electronic monitoring of drug Adherence
A pie chart with 97% green
Accuracy that the pill actually is taken when it has been taken out from the package.

Failure to confirm efficacy,
example: HIV therapy

When self-reporting, 90% reported that they adhere to treatment. When pill-counting it turns out 86% of the patients were adhering to treatment, not 90%. When taking plasma samples through blood tests it turned out only 30% were adhering to treatment, a far less percentage than what was reported by the patients themselves and through pill-counting.

Reference: M.Burnier (2019) Is there a threshold for medication adherence? Lessons learnt from electronic monitoring of drug Adherence
Adherence based on self-reports
Adherence based on returned-products counts
Adherence based plasma samples through blood tests

Mevia's solutions

Collect adherence data

Collect real-time adherence data with Mepill or Medose. Cellular devices that connect to medicine packages and automatically let you know when a dose is taken. Choose between Mepill, for single-pill blisters and Medose for multiple pill dose-dispenser.

Follow adherence data in real-time

View the collected real-time adherence data in our digital dashboard. It allows administrative users to follow-up on adherence behaviours and know when extra counselling is needed. Extract customised PDF:s for accessible material to share.

Provide treatment support

Provide customised treatment support and collect the health data you need with our easy-to-use application or SMS to Web-set up. The doses are automatically updated in the application when taken by Mepill or Medose.

Interested in our solutions?